High Hampton Inn
Blogging From Our Little Corner Of Cashiers And Highlands, North Carolina

Posts Tagged ‘gardening’

Insider Tips to High Hampton Inn: Secrets You Won’t Find in the Brochure

June 10th, 2011 by Staff

If it’s your first time visiting High Hampton, you may wonder why you see adults and children walking around with carrots and apples in their hands.  These items aren’t snacks for people.  Instead, they are treats for our resident miniature donkeys Fred and Ed, who love snack time and being petted.  You can ask the front desk staff to assist you with gathering fruit and vegetables from the kitchen so you can feed Fred and Ed.

Black and gray miniature donkeys

High Hampton Inn's miniature donkeys - Fred and Ed

High Hampton has been bringing generations of families together for 89 years.  Some of these families have been here some many times that they know the ins and outs of this unique destination.  So, what do you do if you are a first-time visitor and aren’t familiar with High Hampton’s special traditions?  Have no fear!  These tips will give you the inside scoop on the Inn so you’ll feel like you’ve been coming here for generations!

Your Table Awaits!

Dining at High Hampton is truly a unique experience.  All meals at the Inn are served in the spacious Dining Room and feature buffets loaded with fresh local fruits and vegetables and high country favorites like mouthwatering fried chicken.  You are assigned a table that you will return to throughout your visit, meaning you will never have to worry about not finding a seat.  The most interesting aspect of dining at High Hampton is that you are asked to dress for dinner.  Men of all ages are asked to wear a suit and tie, and women should dress accordingly.  On Monday and Thursday nights, the dress is business casual so a coat and tie are not required.

Daily Fun!

Each day, a list of activities will be placed in the foyer outside of the dining room.  Activities that require a fee will be marked with an asterisk.  Sign up sheets will be located on the table to the left, under the bulletin board.

Kids swimming and diving at Hampton Lake

Summer fun at High Hampton on the lake

Splish, Splash, Fun!

The 35-acre Hampton Lake is a highlight of summer activities.  You can swim, fish and non-motorized boat here while enjoying the surrounding scenery.  The lake features a roped-off shallow area for younger swimmers and a floating diving dock for the older kids.  You can rent paddle boats, canoes, rowboats, kayaks or a sailboat for $7 per hour from the front desk and spend the afternoon floating on the shimmering water.  Fishing aficionados will delight in the fact that there are no fees to fish the lake, but anything caught should be released.  If you forgot your fishing gear, you may rent a pole for $1 per hour or buy a kit for $15 from the front desk.

Create Your Own Bouquet!

High Hampton is home to more than an acre of stunning dahlia blooms every summer.  There are hundreds of flowers, in a rainbow colors, and you are allowed to cut them to place in your room or to take home with you.  The front desk is happy to provide you with scissors and a vase so you can decorate your room.

If you are a seasoned High Hampton visitor, what are some other tips you would share with a first-time guest?

Opening Weekend Q & A with General Manager Clifford Meads

April 22nd, 2011 by Staff

As High Hampton Inn prepares to open for its 89th season of family fun, General Manager Clifford Meads took some time out of his busy schedule to give some insight on the upcoming season and on some of his favorite things about High Hampton Inn.

General Manager Clifford Meads

1.  What is new at High Hampton Inn in 2011?

High Hampton Inn is known for being a destination that adheres to time-honored traditions.  This year we are excited to announce two new events and one new House Party that are sure to become High Hampton favorites.

For music lovers, the Coast to the Mountains Summer Concert Series on June 23, July 28, August 25, and September 22 will be the perfect way to enjoy the beauty of the mountains while listening to music from the coast.  Food lovers will enjoy the Dinner in the Dahlias series on August 30 and September 13.  Thirty guests will be seated at a long table decorated with and surround by the heirloom dahlia blooms. The experience will allow diners to intertwine the flora, food, and wine of High Hampton.  The Apple Festival on September 24 will be the perfect way to honor fall’s favorite fruit. This House Party style weekend will celebrate the apple with a variety of tasty products from area growers and producers.

We are also excited to announce the addition of the Hampton Market.  The market will feature fresh produce, meats, gourmet cheeses, prepared gourmet salads, party platters, wine, beer, rustic breads, desserts, a selection of dry goods, and gourmet deli sandwiches.

Guests staying in our lovely cottages will also notice the addition of kitchenettes the feature marble counter tops, a refrigerator and microwave.

2.  What is your favorite time of year at High Hampton?

High Hampton Inn is beautiful year-round, but my absolute favorite time is in late May – early June when all of the mountain laurel and rhododendron are blooming.  Bursts of pinks and purples dot the lush green landscape, making for quite an amazing sight.

Dogwoods bloom at the enterance of High Hampton Inn

 

3.  Where does High Hampton get its produce from?

High Hampton is known for its fresh fruits and vegetables.  We work with local farmers and markets to provide our guests with produce at the peak of perfection.  Many guests love the tomatoes that we feature on the buffet, which we purchase from a local farm stand, guaranteeing that they will always be delicious and perfectly ripe.

 

4.  Where on-property do you like to go to relax?

I love being outdoors, so when I have free time I like to take my dogs hiking on one of the many trails that surround the Inn.  It’s a great way to unwind while taking in all the stunning sights.

Take a Stroll in High Hampton’s Historic Dahlia Gardens

February 2nd, 2011 by Staff

dahlia-from-high-hampton-dahlia-garden_inga-swett High Hampton Inn’s beautiful historic Dahlia Garden comprises almost an acre of colorful blooms.  They were first planted more than 100 years ago by Caroline Halsted, a niece of General Wade Hampton, the original owner of the High Hampton property.  She was the wife of Dr. William Halsted, the internationally-acclaimed first Chief of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University and the second owner of High Hampton.  The garden displays many pure colors and variegated blossoms that bloom in late summer and early fall.  Guests of the Inn are invited to cut blooms to display in their rooms for a beautiful splash of color or to take home with them upon departure.

To take some of the High Hampton spirit home with you, plant your own dahlia garden.  The beautiful colors of the flowers will take you back to the Inn every time you see them.

 

How to Plant a Dahlia Garden:

  1. Select a planting location that receives full sun. It’s very important to wait until after the last frost to plant your bulb.
  2. Add organic compost to the soil prior to planting. The compost should be worked into the existing soil to a depth of 18 inches. Dahlias grow quickly and require excellent growing conditions to perform at their best.
  3. Dig a large planting hole that is at least twice as deep as the length of the dahlia tuber, deeper if possible and equally as wide. Add a tablespoon of super-phosphate fertilizer to the bottom of each planting hole. The fertilizer will provide the nutrients necessary to develop root growth.
  4. Place the tuber in the bottom of the hole and fill in the soil only to the top of the stem. The hole should remain partially filled with just the top of the stem sticking up until you begin to see growth.
  5. Fill in the hole gradually to cover the new growth as the tuber begins to grow. Covering the stem inch by inch as it grows causes the stem to grow strong so that it will support the flowers.
  6. Begin watering when the plants are actively growing above ground. Water deeply to encourage strong roots.